Day 24 and Day 25 of NaNo and I’m a winner!

NaNoWriMo 2016 is done and dusted. Or is it?

I’ve written 54,493 words and a few hours ago I pasted my text into the NaNoWriMo word count goblin, and he chewed it up, spat it out, and said ‘YES, you’re a winner!‘. Then the NaNo crew appeared, yelled their congratulations and gave me a round of applause.

This is my 6th NaNoWriMo win, and it’s still a great thrill to have finished.

But, wait, it isn’t over yet. As a NaNo rebel, my self-inflicted challenge was to write 30 short stories during the 30 days of November. One story per day. #30days30shorts

a short story by Ruth Livingstone, authorDay 24: Goodbye Cruel World

The prompt for this story was another Writing Magazine competition.

The theme?   “Goodbye.”

I got the idea for this story some time ago, but it didn’t turn out exactly as I planned. That’s been happening with many of my stories this month. They’ve been running feral and tearing off in new directions. Continue reading “Day 24 and Day 25 of NaNo and I’m a winner!”

Time for a fairy tale?

Catching up with NaNo Day 23

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Wrote a short story yesterday. 1,700 words.

A modern-day fairy tale about a little princess who lives in a palace with no mirrors, and is blissfully happy, until… one day… she discovers the monster in the garden.

Posting an update on my 5 year goal and November progress soon, and then must get on with day 25 of NaNoWriMo and my next short story. Continue reading “Time for a fairy tale?”

NaNo Day 22, and no sci-fi, I promise.

Ahem, sorry. I lied!

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Just couldn’t resist continuing with another ‘what if’ scenario based around cryogenics.

In my first story, a group of convicts were sent to the Cryonics Facility for indefinite storage.

More centuries have passed and The United Worlds is a blissfully peaceful place. And, so, when the miners in the Kuiper Belt mount a bloody revolution, the President and her Security Chief have no idea how to deal with it.

Then they hit on a bright idea. Why not talk to people who know all about bloody violence? Why not resurrect the criminals from their frozen sleep?

As I’m sure you have already predicted, this bright idea turns out to be not-so-bright, after all.


I wrote this story a couple of days ago, but was busy yesterday with a trip to the Amazon Academy event in London. It was a day full of interesting insights into how Amazon plans to rule the world, from a pick-and-mix store of technical applications, to the local delivery of fresh food. If cryonics does become widespread in the future, I’m sure Amazon will become involved in that too… unless, of course, they already are.

Frozen for revival

What if the thawing process goes horribly wrong?

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Today’s story is a continuation of yesterday’s theme, inspired by the sad case of the 14-year-old girl with terminal cancer (known as J.S.) who fought to have her body cryogenically stored.

In my imaginary Biocryonics Facility, they are running out of space. To make room for new clients, some of the old ones must be sacrificed.

The Science Officer argues the cryonics processes back in the early  21st Century was very rudimentary. There is no way that stored clients from that era could be successfully revived. Or could they? Continue reading “Frozen for revival”

Would you choose to be frozen?

But could you choose who to unfreeze?

cryogenic-in-perpetuity-gif-500That’s the premise for my latest short story.

The vats are full and your failing cryonics company has to make room for a new batch of inmates. Who do you choose to terminate? And does first in, first out seem the fairest way of doing it?

This story was inspired by the real life case, of a young girl  dying from cancer at the tragically young age of 14, who wanted her body to be cryogenically preserved in the hope that a cure might be found one day in the future.

But, what ifContinue reading “Would you choose to be frozen?”